Malaysia's Gen Z Crave For Different Career Choices

Last update: 17/03/2015

KUALA LUMPUR, March 17 (Bernama) -- Most of the Generation Z (Gen Z) in the country prefer to venture into something completely new when come to making career choices, a survey by INTI International University and Colleges revealed.



The survey, conducted in November and December last year and involved over 500 urban respondents in the Klang Valley, Johor and Penang, found that 42 per cent of those surveyed want to do something completely new, while 37 per cent said they hoped to turn their hobbies into a profession.



Another 37 per cent interviewed said they want to be entrepreneurs.



"They are self-starters, wanting to be entrepreneurs to carve out their own unique career path and are hungry to acquire skills such as creativity, teamwork and leadership," INTI's Chief Executive Officer Rohit Sharma said when revealing the survey findings, here, today.



Gen Z refers to those born between year 1995 and 2009.



High internet connectivity and unlimited resources through digital platforms also encouraged greater sense of responsibility to the world and society with about 28 per cent of them wanting to do voluntary work and participate in work that contribute to the well-being of society, the study said.



Fifty-six per cent of Gen Z expressed that their biggest worry was to find a good job, 44 per cent suggested that being accepted into a reputable higher education institution, while 42 per cent said their family's financial situation mattered.



"It is clear that Gen Z is well-informed and takes into consideration many external factors when deciding the next step in life, they are clearly aware (50 per cent) that education is an essential tool to help them improve their lives and those around them," Sharma said.



The findings also revealed that Gen Z expressed concern over Internet security with close to 60 per cent of 15 to 20 years olds saying they are worried about fake profiles on social networking sites while another 54 per cent are extremely concerned about disclosing their personal information online.



It is noted that more than half of this 'hyper-connected' generation stated that they love their gadgets with more than 80 per cent looking at between one to two screens on a daily basis, and some 41 per cent feeling incomplete when not connected.



-- BERNAMA